A letter to Morissey

I’m writing in regards to nothing in particular

But the shyness is not vulgar and I am not a vegetarian, but please listen to me

I know somewhere you’re alive and well and your music is my melancholy heart

And Morissey, I want to know if you ever got what you wanted, and if William found out it was nothing

Because I’ve listened to your records on repeat,

through summer dog days and 4 p.m. winter nights under the Oakville bridge and

I have never found the light that doesn’t go out

And Morissey, does anybody care about the endless kilometers I have walked of their streets in my boots?

About my childhood and the cigarettes my brother has smoked to make up for the ones I haven’t?

And the wind making songs on chimes behind my old house, right above my head?

Morissey, let’s have a cup of tea

Because your jawline could tell me stories of the gardens you have sat in and the barber that cut your hair like that

And I’m so sorry you have never been a happy a day in your life

fulfillments:

there’s a special place in heaven for people who upload entire albums to youtube

(via hannahshands)

This morning I was sad that I don’t look like her

Is it so much to ask that I just want a really pretty, expensive corset?

joshhutchercat:

my heart says yes but my mom says no

(via greeneyesblueskies)

vintagebinger:

The uproar created over the New Look, with its softer shoulder and longer, fuller skirt, went down to footwear — it was inevitable that the well-turned ankle would be the focus and shoe designs had to follow. Above were the newer styles: The broad t-strap, the ankle circlet and the oblique. Life magazine marveled at these designs, commenting that “…the strange geometry of the straps is the most startling innovation.” Photo from Life magazine, September 1947.

(via 49-states-of-dreaming)

Timestamp: 1397604560

vintagebinger:

The uproar created over the New Look, with its softer shoulder and longer, fuller skirt, went down to footwear — it was inevitable that the well-turned ankle would be the focus and shoe designs had to follow. Above were the newer styles: The broad t-strap, the ankle circlet and the oblique. Life magazine marveled at these designs, commenting that “…the strange geometry of the straps is the most startling innovation.” Photo from Life magazine, September 1947.

(via 49-states-of-dreaming)

plizm:

Painter and their muse, 2013
Bernhard Handick

(via jewist)

Timestamp: 1397604472

plizm:

Painter and their muse, 2013
Bernhard Handick

(via jewist)

Heart strings (tendons) inside the human heart. (source)

(via greeneyesblueskies)

Timestamp: 1397604358

Heart strings (tendons) inside the human heart. (source)

(via greeneyesblueskies)